Apparently Global Language Monitor has declared that “Web 2.0” is the English Language’s millionth word.

┬áBut this doesn’t seem to have impressed British academics according to the Guardian:

Professor David Crystal, professor of linguistics at Bangor University, called the idea “the biggest load of rubbish I’ve heard in years”. He said: “It is total nonsense. English reached 1 million words years ago. It’s like someone standing by the side of the road counting cars, and when they get to 1 million pronouncing that to be the millionth car in the world. It’s extraordinary.”

And the Daily Mail also achieved this excellent quote:

However John Simpson, chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, said: ‘We find it curious that Web 2.0, a term that was coined in 1999 and has been in broad use since 2004, is being regarded as a new entrant to the language.”

So overall, measurement of entomology with high precision seems to have its flaws and is more about publicity than useful fact. I am proud of the balanced journalism by both these media groups in the reporting.

My boss announced this morning that he had broken his Samsung smartphone, so he needed a new phone and wanted to know what his options were. Everyone in the company uses Blackberry phones except the Korean staff because UK Blackberry phones don’t come with Korean support.

This also bugged me because I get emails from my Korean colleagues and often I can’t see who has emailed me (by recogition of the characters) it just comes up as black blocks (or rather did come…).

Continue reading “Adding Asian/CJK fonts to Blackberry”

Our call centre isn’t big, but then again it is very efficient and rarely has dropped or missed calls. Plus we have sufficient measures in place to allow us to call people back as soon as things slack off.

However, yesterday a client called to ask about something (which being a broadcast problem wasn’t our problem and wasn’t our fault), and he called during a busy period. After being on old for 4min 31seconds he was offered the opportunity of being called back rather than waiting, he could leave a message with his details and normally we call back within a couple of hours at most. He left this message:

NSFW: http://www.orbit.me.uk/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=1206

Pleasent chap to use that kind of bad language to some people who are there to help and who weren’t actually responsible for his troubles. But it’s our box they are using it must be our fault.

He was called back, around 10min later, funnily he hadn’t left his phone number on the message but everything is logged anyway. He was very sheepish and humble; surprised to be called back by someone so helpful.

 

 Over the years I have travelled a fair bit, more than my fair share and I have no intention of stopping now I have started. Luckly my work keeps me on the move and I should average about once a month out of the UK. I have also made a habbit of socialising internationally from college to present day. I have played with many languages over the years: French, Japanese, Spanish, German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian and now Greek, none very successfully however but I tried for love and money.

 Combining these two elements I have drawn some conclusions about different countries approaches to language…

Continue reading “Language when travelling”